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In 1924 the existence of a Roman villa was discovered which means people have dwelled in Folkestone for 2000 years. Saxon and Jute burial grounds bear testimony that ancient people once lived and died in the region at the edge of the English sea.
C. 635 Eanswyth, daughter of Eadbald King of Kent, founded a Christian house in the locale of the Bayle. Such was her holy fame, she was canonised for miracles attributed to her. Today the majestic Parish church of St Eanswyth is dedicated to Saints Mary and Eanswyth. History tells a story of a heavenly destiny that was meant to be. The first church bearing her name was destroyed due to cliff erosion.
C. 867 Viking raiders destroy the second House of God. It is thought that a third church built by King Athelstan was razed in 1052 by Earl Godwin en-route to his showdown with King Edward the Confessor. In 1095, Nigel de Muneville succeeded as the Lord of the Manor and to him is attributed the basis of the modern day Parish church.
There is a mention in the Doomsday survey which records the Folkestone “Hundred” was valued at £100, and it is estimated that about 800 people lived in the town

The history of Folkestone